Plato impact on christianity

Visit Website The young Plato became a devoted follower of Socrates—indeed, he was one of the youths Socrates was condemned for allegedly corrupting. Aroundthe year-old Plato returned to Athens and founded his philosophical school in the grove of the Greek hero Academus, just outside the city walls. In his open-air Academy he delivered lectures to students gathered from throughout the Greek world nine-tenths of them from outside Athens. Plato died in Athens, and was probably buried on the Academy grounds.

Plato impact on christianity

He was born into a wealthy and aristocratic family with a political background. Plato's father claimed he was a descendent of Codrus, the last king of Athens; on his mother's side he was related to a Greek lawmaker by the name of Solon.

Plato's father died when he was still young and the rest of his childhood was spent with his mother and her new husband Pyrilampes, an Athenian politician. Although Plato had many political influences in his childhood, he chose not to serve in the same manner as his family had.

Plato chose not to become associated with the declining Athenian politics, but rather he began writing poetry and competing in athletics. As Plato grew older he was introduced to pre-Socratic philosophical teachings concerning metaphysics and knowledge.

Sometime early in his life, Plato met Socrates, an infamous Greek philosopher who was gathering a sizeable following. Plato became a prominent follower of Socrates and adopted many ideas from his teachings. Plato is known to have accepted Socrates dialogue form of conversation and his striving to understand truth.

Through time spent with Socrates, Plato eventually began developing his own ideas, theories and understandings of philosophy. In Socrates was tried and convicted of many charges surrounding his teachings and actions, resulting in execution. Fearing for his life, Plato left Athens and began travelling the area of the Mediterranean.

Plato travelled throughout Egypt, Italy and Sicily in search of philosophers, religious leaders and astronomers with whom he could learn. During his travels Plato began to write his first dialogues. Using the conversational method of Socrates, he began recording theories of his own.

In Plato returned to Athens and established the Academy, what many consider the first university. Plato used the Academy to share his knowledge, experience and theories with young philosophers.

Through his teachings Plato influenced many young philosophers within the Greek society.

Introduction

Most of Plato's teaching occurred at the Academy. Plato continued to develop his philosophy and record it in writings while teaching others his theories.

Although he taught many theories and subjects at the Academy, two theories held vast influence in his philosophy. The Divided Line theory and the Allegory of the Cave are Plato's main focus in teaching concerning forms and knowledge.

Eusebius of Caesarea

One of the foci of Plato's philosophy is his idea of forms. According to Plato a form is similar to an idea, it is only able to be seen by the mind and it has no physical structure. Forms are not of this world, but exist in a separate realm of forms; a Platonic heaven.

Since forms are not worldly they are simply the essence behind worldly things. Plato teaches that forms are not limited to objects, but rather forms exist universally for all aspects of life.

Plato's Divided Line theory was a means of categorizing the forms and separating them from their opposing matter. Plato subdivides the parallel classifications of types of being and types of knowing into two major subgroups.

Images and ordinary objects belong to the visible world and are "known" through our sense organs. I put known in quotation marks because Plato claims that knowledge through senses is not properly knowledge at all, but only opinion.

Mathematical and geometrical objects, together with forms, belong to the intelligible world and are known through the "eye of the mind.

Plato impact on christianity

Those beings that are perceived through the senses are known as matter. An ordinary object is simple matter.From Augustine to Eriugena: Essays on Neoplatonism and Christianity in Honor of John O'ashio-midori.comgton: Catholic University of America Press.

Matthews, Alfred Warren. The Development of St. Augustine, From Neoplatonism to Christianity, A.D. Washington: University Press of America.

O'Daly, Gerard. Christian Estimate of Plato "The peculiarity of the Platonic philosophy," says Hegel, in his "History of Philosophy" (vol.

ii.), "is precisely this direction toward the supersensuous world, -- it seeks the elevation of consciousness into the realm of spirit. It was the Christian platonists (which is not the same thing as Plato, the philosopher) who believed in the pre-existence of matter and souls, and it was Aristotle's first mover that was adapted by St.

Thomas into the cosmological argument for creation ex nihilo. Drafty Plato was born in BC in Athens, Greece.

Neoplatonism and Christianity - Wikipedia

He was born into a wealthy and aristocratic family with a political background. Plato's father claimed he was a descendent of Codrus, the last king of Athens; on his mother's side he was related to a Greek lawmaker by the name of Solon.

5 Troels Engberg-­‐Pedersen, "Setting the Scene: Stoicism and Platonism in the Transitional Period in Ancient Philosophy," in Stoicism in Early Christianity, ed.

Tuomas Tasimus, Troels Engberg-­‐Pedersen, and Ismo Dunderberg(Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, ), 4-­‐8. Plato was born in BC in Athens, Greece. He was born into a wealthy and aristocratic family with a political background.

Plato's father claimed he was a descendent of Codrus, the last king of Athens; on his mother's side he was related to a Greek lawmaker by the name of Solon.

Christianity and Hellenistic philosophy - Wikipedia